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Food Security and Livelihood Team Leader at Solidarites International (SI)

Solidarités International (SI) is a French humanitarian organisation operating for over 35 years who is committed to providing aid in the event of conflict and natural disasters. Our mission is to provide aid as quickly and as efficiently as possible to endangered populations by meeting their vital needs:  water, food and shelter.

SI has started activities in North-eastern Nigeria in August 2016 in the fields of Wash and is now intervening in 4 areas of the state for Wash and Shelter activities.

We are recruiting to fill the position below:

Job Title: Food Security and Livelihood Team Leader

Job Location: Monguno                           
Beginning of contract: ASAP   
Contract duration: 3 months (with possibility of extension) – Probation period: 1 month

Goal / Purpose

  • The FSL Team Leader will coordinate a team of Agronomists, Cash officer and Livestock officers in order to set up the Food Security and Livelihoods activities, ensuring that Solidarités International technical recommendations and procedures are followed.

Liste of Main Task
Setting up the activities /control and supervision:

  • Plan the weekly activities for his/her team and have them approved by his/her Line manager:
    • Plan human resources needs (daily workers, workers…)
    • Plan tool and material needs (request from stock)
    • Qnticipate administrative issues (requests in advance)
    • Anticipate logistics issues (transport, communication means…)
  • Organize and carry out, with his/her team, tasks assigned by his/her Line manager
  • Supervise and monitor each stage of activity. Ensure that standards and instructions given by his/her Line manager, as well as Solidarités procedures, are followed
  • Respect schedules and deadlines agreed upon with his/her Line manager
  • Report back any problems and constraints encountered during the course of the activities and suggest operational solutions

Logistics and Administration:

  • When recruiting daily workers, follow procedures and directives outlined by his/her Line manager and the administrative service
  • Train his/her team members to use and maintain the available tools correctly
  • Track usage with monitoring tools provided
  • Enforce safety procedures
  • Ensure that safety procedures are followed by members of his/her team
  • Monitor the quality and quantity of material delivered to working sites
  • Ensure the receipt and storage of material and equipment necessary for his/her work to be carried out on site

Reporting / communication:

  • Take part in weekly program meetings and clusters on request
  • Keep his/her monitoring tools and files archived in the Solidarités office, accessible to his/her line manager
  • Draw up and submit a weekly task report (which should include progress made by the team) to his/her line manager
  • Take part in the drafting of the monthly program pack
  • Establish and maintain good relations with local participants and communities (populations) in the operational fields
  • Listen to the populations and local participants in the field and report to his/her line manager any non-technical or safety-related issues which could affect the activities or safety of Solidarités International teams

Setting up the activities /control and supervision:

  • Plan the weekly activities for his/her team and have them approved by his/her Line manager:
    • Plan human resources needs (daily workers, workers…)
    • Plan tool and material needs (request from stock)
    • Anticipate administrative issues (requests in advance)
    • Anticipate logistics issues (transport, communication means…)
  • Organize and carry out, with his/her team, tasks assigned by his/her Line manager
  • Supervise and monitor each stage of activity. Ensure that standards and instructions given by his/her Line manager, as well as Solidarités procedures, are followed
  • Respect schedules and deadlines agreed upon with his/her Line manager
  • Report back any problems and constraints encountered during the course of the activities and suggest operational solutions

Logistics and Administration:

  • When recruiting daily workers, follow procedures and directives outlined by his/her Line manager and the administrative service
  • Train his/her team members to use and maintain the available tools correctly
  • Track usage with monitoring tools provided
  • Enforce safety procedures
  • Ensure that safety procedures are followed by members of his/her team
  • Monitor the quality and quantity of material delivered to working sites
  • Ensure the receipt and storage of material and equipment necessary for his/her work to be carried out on site

Reporting / communication:

  • Take part in weekly program meetings and clusters on request
  • Keep his/her monitoring tools and files archived in the Solidarités office, accessible to his/her line manager
  • Draw up and submit a weekly task report (which should include progress made by the team) to his/her line manager
  • Take part in the drafting of the monthly program pack
  • Establish and maintain good relations with local participants and communities (populations) in the operational fields
  • Listen to the populations and local participants in the field and report to his/her line manager any non-technical or safety-related issues which could affect the activities or safety of Solidarités International teams

Personal Abilities

  • Professional experience: 1 year of experience in similar position (NGO/Private or Public sector) – Humanitarian experience is a plus
  • Languages: English (mandatory), Kanori, Haussa, Shua (additional languages a plus)
  • Personal qualities: reliable, honest, very good organization, resistance to stress, good interpersonal skills (internal and external communication), team player, capacity to delegate and to manage, initiative and autonomy, capacity of prioritization of tasks

Technical competences:

  • Training: University degree in Civil Engineering or a similar domain.
  • Relevant experience on Food items distribution and monitoring will be highly appreciated.
  • Project related skills : good knowledge of the project cycle, project implementation, project follow-up
  • IT skills: Good knowledge of Office software : Excel, Word, GIS, and drawing software (autocad)

Salary and Conditions
In accordance with SI’s Terms of Employment; for national staff in Nigeria.

Application Closing Date

26th October, 2018.

How to Apply

Interested and qualified candidates should:

Note

  • Candidates should select “FSL Team Leader Monguno ” and also fill the application form inside the link above and attach their CV’s
  • The CV attached must be named with your name and surname.
  • As position is required as soon as possible, Solidarites International reserves the right to select a candidate and finalize the recruitment before the final date.

Source

https://www.hotnigerianjobs.com/hotjobs/197175/food-security-and-livelihood-team-leader-at-solida.html

Beyond Food Security: Challenges in Food Safety Policies Based on International Certifications along a Heterogeneous Food Chain. Its Effects in Mexican´s Health and Poverty[v1]

Beyond Food Security: Challenges in Food Safety Policies Based on International Certifications along a Heterogeneous Food Chain. Its Effects in Mexican´s Health and Poverty[v1]

PreprintArticleVersion 1This version is not peer-reviewed

Beyond Food Security: Challenges in Food Safety Policies Based on International Certifications along a Heterogeneous Food Chain. Its Effects in Mexican´s Health and Poverty

Version 1 : Received: 15 October 2018 / Approved: 16 October 2018 / Online: 16 October 2018 (07:49:00 CEST)

How to cite: Mayett-Moreno, Y.; Popp, J.S.; Crandall, P. Beyond Food Security: Challenges in Food Safety Policies Based on International Certifications along a Heterogeneous Food Chain. Its Effects in Mexican´s Health and Poverty. Preprints2018, 2018100336 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201810.0336.v1). Mayett-Moreno, Y.; Popp, J.S.; Crandall, P. Beyond Food Security: Challenges in Food Safety Policies Based on International Certifications along a Heterogeneous Food Chain. Its Effects in Mexican´s Health and Poverty. Preprints 2018, 2018100336 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201810.0336.v1).

Abstract

Taking four of the United Nations Development Goals as reference, this overview describes the need to see from a systemic perspective, the food certifications programs along the food chain in Mexico as today food certifications are voluntary. Using secondary data, the main objectives were: a) there is a fall short in food safety policies and those federal agencies responsible for food safety, to guarantee safe food along the whole domestic food chain, especially in that for low income players; b) the amount of the Mexican Federal Budget Expenses devoted to safety food issues is really low, considering the health, well- being, and food security consequences; and c) due the structural heterogeneity of the Mexican food market, there is a lack of coordination in food regulations along all agents of the food supply chain, bringing to alternate informal markets that put at risk peoples´ health, increasing poverty and inequalities. According to this exercise, only 0.7- 8.7% of producers, 12.5% of supermarkets as well as 42.8% of restaurants would have some type of certifications. Public policies must attend this issue in order to improve food safety and security for the whole population, reducing inequalities, poverty and ensuring them a healthy live.

Subject Areas

domestic markets; small producers; retailers; informal restaurants; low-income population; minister of health; well-being

Copyright: This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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Source

http://www.preprints.org/manuscript/201810.0336/v1

Event Recap: Food Security in a Changing Climate

Event Recap: Food Security in a Changing Climate

With this week’s headline-grabbing report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), it is clear that the consequences of a world just 1.5ºC warmer than pre-industrial levels could have a drastic impact on global food security.

After decades of progress made towards reducing global hunger, last year saw hunger levels increase for the third year in a row. Why is this happening? September’s release of the 2018 State of Food Security in the World confirmed that this upward trend was due to two key factors: conflict and climate change.

On October 9, Global Washington hosted a dialogue with a panel of experts and practitioners who are leading efforts around the world to improve food security and address climate change.

The panel included Chris Jochnick, CEO, Landesa; Chris Shore, Chief Development Officer, Economic Empowerment, World Vision USA; and Juan Echanove, Senior Director for Food and Nutrition Security, CARE. The dialogue was moderated by Gabrielle Fitzgerald, Founder and CEO, Panorama.

Climate change and hunger cross paths on the farm

Reflecting on experiences from their work across the world, panelists identified that the majority of people who are at risk of going hungry are also among those most vulnerable to climate change. One thing they have in common – they’re small-scale farmers.

“The majority of world’s poor share three traits – they’re rural, they depend on land [for their livelihoods], and they don’t have secure title to that land,” said Scott Jochnick from Landesa.
The twisted irony of being a food producer who is likely to go hungry is due to a wide range of issues. Many of these small-scale farmers work on marginal land with poor soil quality or steep slopes, and don’t have access to financial services such as appropriate loans or crop insurance.

Chris Shore from World Vision USA shared, “Whenever I visit a new community, I seek out the oldest or most experienced farmer and ask, ‘for as long as you have been farming, what is the biggest change you have seen?’ I have never found anyone who didn’t say, ‘It’s the weather. We can no longer depend on the weather, when the rain will come, and how much rain will come.’”

Moderator Gabrielle Fitzgerald reflected on the content of IPCC’s report, highlighting that the future of food security would be threatened by extreme droughts, wildfires, floods, and food shortages for hundreds of millions of people.

“We are already seeing these impacts today,” added Juan Echanove from CARE. “Weather patterns have changed: rains are later, droughts are longer, and weather disasters are more frequent. It’s tragic, and it’s everywhere.”

Ingredients for a successful response

With the present challenges of food insecurity and climate change poised to increase in the coming years, the panelists shared successful strategies to not only reduce hunger in a changing climate, but also strengthen communities and their ability to withstand shocks in the future.

To start, smart investments focus on women.

“Empowering women and building their agency is not just a matter of principle and social justice. It is also essential to improving agricultural systems,” said Juan Echanove from CARE. “If women had equal access to agricultural resources like land and training, the number of hungry people could be reduced globally by 150 million,” citing a study from the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations.

Women tend to be “better stewards of the land” and more likely to practice climate-smart farming techniques such as agroforestry and biodiversity, added Chris Jochnick from Landesa. Improving access and rights for women would allow them and their families to be more resilient to climate change impacts.

Land access and ownership was a second prominent theme. Improving land access and ownership goes hand-in-hand with the principles of local agency and ownership highlighted by all panelists.

“Farmers that feel secure about their land rights are more likely to plant trees instead of short-term crops, adopt climate-smart approaches to agriculture, and focus on soil conservation,” said Chris Jochnick.

To illustrate the dramatic changes possible through land ownership, Chris Shore from World Vision shared two photos of a hillside in Ethiopia. The arid landscape of the first photo contrasted starkly with the lush vegetation of the very same hillside in the second photo. The difference? A process of “Farmer Managed Natural Regeneration” where land ownership allowed farming communities to protect the forest, allowing it to gradually regrow instead of clear-cutting the trees for charcoal.

Denuded hillside in Humbo, Ethiopia, 2000. Photo: World Vision.

Lush, regrown hillside in Humbo, Ethiopia, 2007. Photo: World Vision.

The results were more than just a visual transformation of the landscape. The community had a substantial source of income from cutting and drying grass, harvesting branches instead of entire trees for charcoal, and replenishing the watershed as a result of the increased vegetation. “Within 6 months, springs that had stopped for years were flowing again.”

“The most resilient ecosystem is the most intact one,” concluded Chris Shore.

The future of food security and climate change

With World Food Day approaching on October 16, we are once again reminded that the relationship between our environment and the food we eat can be a precarious one. It is clear that the harmful consequences of climate change are the greatest threat to those who are already the most vulnerable in our societies.

As the impact of climate change intensifies, it is critical for our collective response to include support for those who will be on the frontlines of climate change for years to come.

Jared Klassen has worked on global food security for the past decade, supporting and building coalitions for effective policy change. Previously, Jared worked for the Canadian Foodgrains Bank, Mennonite Central Committee, and a number of coalitions of international charities. Jared’s overseas experience has focused on agriculture and food security, community-based health programs, and local business development in places such as Southern Africa, India, and Latin America.

Women in agriculture are key to boosting food security

Women in agriculture are key to boosting food security

Women in agriculture are key to boosting food security
The more access that women have to resources, the better their family’s diet.
Photo: Dr Jack

Undernutrition is still a major cause of mortality and morbidity around the world. This is an unacceptable situation, and it is a shame on all of us that it still exists.

For example, there are currently 52 million children under five years old who are dangerously underweight, and 155 million children under five years old who have stunted growth as a result of being undernourished.

It has been estimated that approximately 45% of all deaths of children in this age group, amounting to a shocking 3,1 million deaths annually, are associated with undernutrition.

READ 

The longer-term consequences of undernutrition in the world’s children are equally challenging. These include reduced educational achievement capability during the formative years, and then reduced work capacity and associated reduced economic productivity in adulthood.

These factors may have a major negative impact on individuals, households, communities, and entire nations.

At the same time that undernutrition remains a threat and burden to the health and well-being of communities, there are also emerging nutrition-related threats.

The biggest of these is the rise in the number of overweight and obese people. Of the five billion adults presently on the planet, two billion – or two out of five – are overweight or obese.

One in 12 has type 2 diabetes, and there are more than 41 million children under five years old who are overweight.

Food is clearly an extremely important factor in determining health outcomes such as undernutrition and overnutrition. However, the role of food has numerous additional outcomes, such as on the global burden of disease.

First-placed on the list of the top 17 risk factors for ill-health globally are child and maternal malnutrition. Second-placed are dietary risks. Several others further down this list – such as high blood pressure, high plasma-glucose levels, high body-mass index and high total cholesterol – are also related to diet.

Women and agriculture
Agriculture is important because it is the primary producer of most of the food that people eat. Agriculture is also a source of income, and agricultural policy has a major effect on food availability and food prices.

There is growing evidence that these three facets of agriculture are vitally important for ensuring good nutrition and good health in human populations.

READ

It is also becoming increasingly clear that, on all levels, the status of women in agriculture is improving. Women who are involved in agriculture around the world are increasingly having a greater say in intra-household decision-making and in resource allocation, which influences the quality of nutrition in their households.

It is clear that these women’s ability to care effectively for young children is also determined by their work in agriculture. Their own nutritional status, and its intergenerational implications for nutrition, are also important in agriculture.

The enormously important role of agriculture in food and nutrition security is based on four pillars.

These are: ensuring that food is available through agricultural systems and food markets; ensuring that people have access to this food at affordable prices; ensuring that the supply and affordability of this food is stable both within and across years; and ensuring that the right types of food, in terms of their nutritional value and safety, are available for consumption.

Agriculture is also important as a source of employment and income. Up to 30% of a country’s gross domestic product (GDP) and up to 60% of its national employment can come from agriculture, especially in sub-Saharan Africa.

The multiplier effect
The development of agriculture also has important equity dimensions. Support for agriculture through direct policies or interventions to increase agricultural growth has been shown to specifically improve the outcomes of poorer population groups.

The 2008 World Development Report revealed that a 1% GDP growth in a country’s agricultural sector can increase expenditure among the poor by at least 2,5 times as much as 1% GDP growth in other sectors of a country’s economy.

Agriculture has an enormously important role to play in the price of food. Between 2008 and 2010, there were several spikes in food prices around the world.

The UN’s Food and Agriculture Organization estimated that, as a consequence of the food price spikes, in 2009 there was a massive increase in the number of undernourished people because these people could not afford to pay for the food they needed.

A further consequence of these food price spikes was that there were public riots in 22 countries.

This goes to show how important it is that agriculture helps to ensure that food prices remain stable. As a result, while food prices now are at similar levels to those of the 2008 to 2010 period, there are none of the riots of that period because food prices have increased gradually since then instead of spiking.

Empowering women to ensure better family health
Worldwide, women play a critical role in agriculture, in income generation and in food security and nutrition.

In some countries, women are the predominant workers in agriculture, and the sector is becoming feminised because men are leaving rural areas to work in urban areas.

However, in cases where men and women are still living together in rural households, there are complex relations that determine who has control, who has power, and how resources are allocated within these households.

READ 

Evidence is clearly showing us that nowadays the empowerment of women in agriculture is absolutely critical to ensure health and nutrition outcomes within households.

A study conducted in Nepal found that the greater the access that women in agriculture in that country had to resources, inputs and decision-making, the better their diet and that of their children.

This in turn resulted in less stunting among Nepalese children and less undernutrition overall among that country’s rural residents.

This case study in Nepal highlights the need for really important actions to be taken elsewhere in the world to support women in agriculture so they will be empowered to take their rightful role in decision-making and in looking after their families.

This is an excerpt from a presentation, titled ‘Promoting health, sustainability and equity: agriculture’s role’, given by Professor Alan Dangour, via video recording, to the 2018 Ukulinga Howard Davis Memorial Symposium held from 22 to 23 May in Pietermaritzburg, KwaZulu-Natal.

The views expressed in our weekly opinion piece do not necessarily reflect those of Farmer’s Weekly.

For more information, contact Professor Alan Dangour at (UK) 020 7958 8133 or
. Visit .

Source

https://www.farmersweekly.co.za/opinion/by-invitation/women-agriculture-key-boosting-food-security/

From food security to nutrition security

From food security to nutrition security

Written by Ashok Gulati , Ritika Juneja |

Indian farmers, crop produce, Biotechnology, hybrid seeds, food nutritional value, Green Revolution, hunger index, indian express Innovations in biofortified food can alleviate malnutrition only when they are scaled up with supporting policies. (Illustration: Suvajit Dey)

October 16 is observed as the World Food Day to mark the creation of the United Nation’s Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) in 1945. The world body envisions a “zero hunger world” by 2030. Perhaps, the occasion is incomplete without remembering Nobel Peace laureate Norman E Borlaug, whose “miracle seeds” of wheat saved over a billion people from starvation. Borlaug also instituted the World Food Prize in 1986, which is sometimes described as the Nobel Prize in agriculture. It’s important to understand the role of science and technology in ushering the Green Revolution, which ensured food security in India. Today, similar innovations in biotechnology hold the promise to provide nutrition security.

In 1943, the Bengal Famine claimed 1.5 to 3 million lives. After independence, India faced the challenge of feeding 330 million people. The situation became grim when the country was hit by back-to-back droughts in the mid-1960s. Grain production plummeted from 89.4 million metric tonnes (MMT) in 1964-65 to 72.4 MMT in 1965-66. India became heavily dependent on the PL 480 food aid from the US. Self-sufficiency in foodgrains became the country’s top policy priority.

In the early 1960s, India imported 18,000 tonnes of the semi-dwarf high yielding (HY) wheat variety, Lerma Rojo and Sonora 64. Developed by Borlaug and his team at the International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT), Mexico, these wheat varieties proved to be the harbinger of the Green Revolution. Indian scientists adapted the imported germplasm to create indigenous varieties: Kalyan developed by D S Athwal and Sona created by M S Swaminathan. Around the same time, the HY miracle rice, IR8 — developed by Peter Jennings and Henry M Beachell of the International Rice Research Institute (IRRI) — was imported. About a decade later, an improved variety, IR36 — developed by IRRI’s Gurdev Khush — made its presence felt in the country’s fields. The breeding programme under the All India Coordinated Research Project (AICRP) produced Padma and Jaya, the first indigenous HY rice varieties. These became the centrepiece of India’s rice revolution.

Breakthroughs in Basmati rice came with the development of Pusa Basmati 1121 and 1509 from 2005 to 2013. These rice varieties were developed by teams led by V P Singh, A K Singh and K V Prabhu at the Indian Agriculture Research Institute. Pusa Basmati gave Indian rice more value with less water and 50 per cent higher yields compared to the traditional basmati. V Singh et al estimate that the cumulative earnings through exports of Pusa Basmati 1121 between 2008 and 2016 and the sale of the rice variety in the domestic market in the same period to be about $20.8 billion.

Where does India stand today in terms of wheat and rice? While the country’s population has grown by more than four times, from 330 million in 1947 to 1.35 billion in 2018, India’s wheat production has increased by over 15 times in roughly the same period — from about 6.5 MMT in 1950-51 to 99.7 MMT in 2017-18. India contributes about 13 per cent of the world wheat production, next only to China whose share is about 17 per cent. Rice production has shot up by about 5.5 times — from 20.6 MMT in 1950-51 to 112.9 MMT in 2017-18. India has a 23 per cent share in world rice production, next only to China whose share is about 29 per cent. India is also the largest exporter of rice in the world with about 12.7 MMT, valued at $7.7 billion (Basmati at $4.17 billion and Non-Basmati at $3.56 billion) during 2017-18.

Source: Agricultural Statistics at a Glance, Department of Agriculture, Cooperation and Farmers Welfare, Government of India, Agricultural Processing and Export Development Authority (APEDA), Government of India.

Notwithstanding its foodgrain surpluses, the country faces a complex challenge of nutritional security. FAO’s recent publication, The State of Food Security and Nutrition in the World, 2018 estimates that about 15 per cent of the Indian population is undernourished. More than 38 per cent of Indian children aged below five years are stunted and 21 per cent suffer from wasting. Several factors ranging from poor diet, unsafe drinking water, poor hygiene and sanitation, low levels of immunisation and education, especially that of women, contribute to this dismal situation. But latest innovations in biotechnology that fortify major staples with micro nutrients like vitamin A, zinc and iron can be game changers.

Source: Agricultural Statistics at a Glance, Department of Agriculture, Cooperation and Farmers Welfare, Government of India, Agricultural Processing and Export Development Authority (APEDA), Government of India. Source: Agricultural Statistics at a Glance, Department of Agriculture, Cooperation and Farmers Welfare, Government of India, Agricultural Processing and Export Development Authority (APEDA), Government of India.

Globally, the HarvestPlus programme of the Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research (CGIAR) is doing lot of work in this direction. In India, the group has released the iron-rich pearl millet. The Indian Council of Agricultural Research has independently released zinc and iron rich wheat (WB 02 and HPWB 01), rice (DRR Dhan 45), and pearl millet (HHB 299 and AHB 1200) in 2016-17. This could possibly lead to the next breakthrough in staples, making them more nutritious. A research team led by Monika Garg at the National Agri-Food Biotechnology Institute in Mohali has innovated biofortified coloured wheat (black, blue, purple) through crosses between HY Indian cultivars (PBW550, PBW621, HD2967) and coloured wheat from Japan and America. These are rich in anthocyanins (antioxidants such those found in blueberries) and zinc (40 ppm compared to 5 ppm in white wheat). Farmers of the Borlaug Farmers Association from Punjab and Haryana have been roped in to multiply production of this wheat variety. This seems to be the beginning of a new journey, from food security to nutritional security. The best is yet to come. But innovations in biofortified food can alleviate malnutrition only when they are scaled up with supporting policies. This would require increasing expenditure on agri-R&D and incentivising farmers by linking their produce to lucrative markets. Can the Modi government do it? Only time can tell.

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Gulati is Infosys Chair Professor for Agriculture and Juneja is Research Assistant at ICRIER

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What is food security, and what can I do to help achieve it?

What is food security, and what can I do to help achieve it?

Photo: Tim Borny

You might think of hunger as a few belly rumbles before dinner. But in many countries hunger takes on a much more frightening form.

Every day, 815 million people live in hunger, according to the United Nations (UN). Experts predict that a further two billion people will be undernourished by 2050.

Starvation isn’t just an immediate problem, it has lasting consequences. Poor nutrition can seriously impact physical and mental health, particularly in children. Many children in areas of food insecurity suffer from restricted growth and are more susceptible to other health problems and even death.

Food insecurity is a global challenge that needs to be met with the development of better food production systems, education, conflict resolution and other world hunger solutions.

As an ethically-driven volunteer organization structuring projects around the UN Sustainable Development Goals (UN SDGs), GVI helps tackle world hunger by establishing locally-driven projects that will help communities produce enough nutritious food to support themselves.

If you’re interested in volunteering to end hunger, here is what you need to know about food insecurity and what you can do about it.

A closer look: What is food insecurity?

Food insecurity refers to circumstances where people don’t have reliable access to nutritious food. Over time, food insecurity can lead to hunger, malnutrition, and in extreme cases, starvation or even famine.

The World Bank predicts that demand for food globally will rise by 20 percent over the next 15 years. However, food production systems are more fragile than ever.

The causes of food insecurity range from the social and economical to the environmental. Conflict, natural disasters, increasing populations and cycles of poverty are all obstacles to the production and distribution of food.

For example, climate change and food security are closely linked. Extreme weather patterns such as droughts and floods jeopardise crops. At the same time, natural resources are being depleted at an alarming rate. Fresh water, soils and oceans are all under pressure as global populations boom.

Addressing environmental problems in food production could help establish a more secure future for the environment, at the same time as producing healthier and more easily accessible food for communities on a local level.

Working toward sustainable agriculture is an essential part of ending hunger and food insecurity in the long term.

One important distinction to make with food insecurity is that this issue doesn’t mean there isn’t enough food produced in the world – it means many people can’t afford or grow their own supplies.

Social causes of food insecurity include a massive imbalance in food distribution and huge amounts of preventable food waste.

In America around 40 percent of food is wasted at around a cost of two billion dollars. On a worldwide scale, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) states that one-third of food produced is wasted or lost.

World hunger solutions can start on an individual level, by educating ourselves on the importance of food, limiting our own food waste and encouraging supermarkets to sell imperfect fruits and vegetables.

Primarily, though, food security will be achieved through actions on a larger scale. The UN SDGs include a focus on ending hunger in the world.

Photo: Tim Borny

The United Nations Sustainable Development Goals: What is being done to work toward food security?

The UN SDGs address major global challenges. They tackle problems such as poverty, inequality and peace to establish a better future for everyone.

Out of the 17 sustainable development goals, number two is zero hunger. This UN SDG aims to reduce the number of the world’s hungry to zero by 2030. It calls for a change in global food and agriculture systems, and a re-examination of how we produce and consume food globally.

By addressing core issues in agriculture, such as crop biodiversity and gender equality, more food could be produced, and more jobs created within the industry.

Greater agricultural biodiversity will result in more nutritious diets, while empowering women to have access to the same farming resources as men could prevent up to 150 million people from living in hunger, reports the UN.

Supporting smallholder farmers is also critical, as small farms produce as much as 80 percent of food in developing countries.

World hunger solutions are also rooted in education. Educating communities on proper nutrition and more effective farming practices can help support healthy lifestyles that are sustainable in the long run.

what is food security

GVI volunteers work to set up a vegetable garden in Fiji.

Volunteering for food security

As a volunteer, you can fight food insecurity and help to end world hunger by taking part in community development programs that provide nutritional workshops, help set up community gardens, or establish sustainable farming practices. Education-focused community projects also give communities a strong foundation, and work to address the social causes of food insecurity.

All of GVI’s volunteer projects are aligned with the UN SDGs. You can choose from ethical volunteer projects or internships in areas of the world where food security is of greatest concern.

In Fiji you could get involved in sustainable agricultural practices, fresh water management, and other lasting environmental initiatives.

Setting up vegetable gardens might seem simple on the surface, but it is a crucial element in addressing a lack of proper nutrition. This project is an excellent example of holistic health: ensuring that both people and the environment are being properly cared for.

In Costa Rica you could help to plant community gardens and carry out other construction projects. Your efforts could help to sustainably build the coastal town of Quepos.

Teach children of different ages in Peru to open up employment opportunities in the tourism industry. English lessons can give locals a boost by helping them to access more business opportunities.

By teaching English to Buddhist monks in Cambodia you can help young Cambodians achieve better literacy and employment opportunities. Steady incomes in the future mean your students will hopefully never know hunger.

Work with women in Ghana to empower them in their community. Through this project you could help women to access better education, giving them more possibilities to own land and increase their annual incomes.

Browse more community development projects around the world to find more volunteer programs aimed at ending world hunger. For more information or to enroll in a program, get in touch with us today.

Japan Gives Zimbabwe US$ 1 million For Food Security And Health

Japan Gives Zimbabwe US$ 1 million For Food Security And Health

JAPAN GIVES US$1 MILLION FOR FOOD SECURITY, NUTRITION AND HEALTH PROJECT

TSHOLOTSHO – At Tsholotsho Hospital today, the Government of Japan officially handed over a contribution of US$ 1 million to enhance the resilience of drought- and flood-affected communities in Zimbabwe through a comprehensive set of health, nutrition, food security and WASH (water, sanitation and hygiene) interventions. The project is being implemented by the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) and the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) in collaboration with the Government of Zimbabwe.

The project, set to benefit 130,000 people across 11 drought- and flood-affected districts over the course of a year, is helping to safeguard the resilience of the most vulnerable, especially women and children.

The Ambassador of Japan to Zimbabwe, H.E. Mr Toshiyuki Iwado, said that “women in rural areas play a vital role in growing as well as cooking food for their families, and children are the ones who are going to inherit Zimbabwe in the future. Therefore, it is essential to ensure that the needs of rural women and children are met. “

WFP and UNICEF are jointly implementing preventive health, WASH and nutrition care interventions – including nutrition screenings and services, trainings on safe cooking and infectious diseases, and borehole rehabilitations – in Tsholotsho, Mutoko, Centenary, Mbire, and Mt Darwin districts.

In Mt Darwin, in addition to these activities, WFP is implementing Food Assistance for Assets programmes in selected communities which build resilience against future shocks. When completed, the weir dams, nutrition gardens and other projects will help households to generate income and reduce reliance on food assistance.

“Access to clean and safe water is essential for food and nutrition security,” said WFP Representative and Country Director Eddie Rowe. “We cannot achieve Zero Hunger unless we also invest in WASH.”

In addition, WFP food and nutrition support is being provided to pregnant women at maternity waiting homes in Tsholotsho, Bubi, Umguza, Lupane, Hwange, Binga and Nkayi. For many of these women, the assistance provides them with an incentive to give birth in hospitals where they can

receive obstetric care and support for a safe delivery by trained staff, thus helping to reduce instances of maternal and child mortality.

“Building resilience in drought- and flood-affected communities ensures that vulnerable children and women have long-term solutions for favourable food security and health outcomes,” said UNICEF Representative Mohamed Ayoya.

The project is set to run to March 2019, and further funding is required to continue the support and increase impact. The activities directly contribute to strengthening the capacity and fulfilling the aims of the Government of Zimbabwe towards achieving the Sustainable Development Goals, particularly Goals 2 (Zero Hunger) and 3 (Good Health and Well Being).

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Japan Gives Zimbabwe US$ 1 million For Food Security And Health

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https://www.zimeye.net/2018/10/11/japan-gives-jonathan-moyos-constituency-us-1-million-for-food-security-and-health/

‘Made in Odisha’ Food Security Scheme:  Will Hunger Now be addressed?

‘Made in Odisha’ Food Security Scheme:  Will Hunger Now be addressed?

POLICY MAKERS

The Odisha government has come up with its on food security scheme to provide food assistance to those whom the NFSA had left behind. Will this move efficiently address the hunger crisis or will it remain limited to another pre-election move?

The New Leam Staff

Chief Minister Shri Naveen Patnaik / Image Source : Odisha360

Naveen Food Security Scheme has been launched by the state government of Odisha to ensure food distribution and food security in the State. Chief Minister Naveen Patnaik launched the scheme in the state capital city of Bhubaneswar on the occasion of Gandhi Jayanti (2nd October)

The scheme was launched via video conferencing by the Chief Minster wherein he interacted from the secretariat with people of Bolangir, Balasore, Sundergarh and Mayurbhanj districts.

The scheme aims to cover nearly 25 lakhs people under its beneficiary program who are reported to be left out from the Central government’s National Food Security Act (NFSA) 2013.

According to the scheme, people below the poverty line who were left out from the National Food Security Scheme (NFSS) will be included in the scheme. According to the data provided by the 2011 census only 3, 26, 41,800 people were benefitted from the NFSS out of a population of 4, 19, 74, 218 people.

Under the scheme each beneficiary is entitled for a quota of 5 kg rice/month at the rate of 1Rs. per Kg. The people left out under the NFSS were precisely the vulnerable tribal groups, widows, single women without regular support, differently-abled persons, daily wage labourers, persons with leprosy, HIV or other critical ailment, the destitute, internally displaced persons, persons over 60 years of age, transgender and those in the absence of shelters.

The beneficiaries would receive their ration through an e-point of sale device available at the fair price shops.  This scheme would cost the state government an exchequer of 443.5 crore per annum, which is an additional economic burden on the state.

As promised, this scheme would help in eradicating hunger by providing sufficient and nutritious food to the beneficiaries. It is important to note that this initiative taken by the Odisha government to launch its own food security scheme and to include all those who had been left out from the National Food Security Act (NFSA) is worth probing into.  The food security scheme can also be viewed as a move to woo voters ahead of the Assembly elections next year.

The post  ‘Made in Odisha’ Food Security Scheme:  Will Hunger Now be addressed? appeared first on The New Leam.

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Somerville Health Foundation Grants to Tackle Mental Health, Food Security, and Substance Use

Somerville Health Foundation Grants to Tackle Mental Health, Food Security, and Substance Use

Somerville is known for being inclusive—it’s home to young professionals and families, lifelong residents and immigrants, and it’s one of the most ethnically diverse cities in the country. But when it comes to our wellbeing, there’s still a long way to go to equality: The city faces “continued health disparities based on race/ethnicity and socioeconomic status,” according to the 2017 Wellbeing of Somerville Report.

That’s where the Somerville Health Foundation comes in. Since 1996, the foundation has worked toward health equity by awarding small grants to community projects. This year, the six winners each won a grant of between $2,000 and $5,000.

“The foundation is looking at why are some people more impacted by health issues than others, and then trying to collectively think about how we can do things differently to influence those factors,” says Lisa Brukilacchio, director of the Somerville Community Health Agenda at the Cambridge Health Alliance (CHA).

The trustees of the foundation assess Somerville’s most pressing health needs, or “priority areas,” as they call them, by analyzing available data. Many of these priority areas have been at the top of the list for years, including mental health, substance use, violence, physical activity, food and nutrition, and chronic disease.

The winners of the Somerville Health Awards are chosen for their efforts to address those priority areas, Brukilacchio explains. For example, one of this year’s winning organizations is Parenting Journey, a nonprofit that offers educational programs for parents. The funding will go toward its Sober Parenting Journey program, an adaptation of the evidence-based Parenting Journey program that was developed for parents coping with substance use recovery.

Three of the six winners of the grant focus on mental health and will use the funding to help improve the social-emotional development of young people. Neighborhood Counseling & Community Services, an organization that aims to make mental health services available to all, received funding for its “Life Hacks for Teens” program at the Next Wave and Full Circle Alternative Schools.

RESPOND, a domestic violence prevention agency that provides shelter, a hotline, and training and educational services, was awarded grant money for an initiative that will allow the children they serve to be connected with private counseling services, without the slowdown of paperwork and waiting lists.

Finally, Breakthrough Greater Boston, a newcomer to the city of Somerville, received funding for assessments and targeted group interventions to help the students it serves at Somerville High School.

The remaining two winners work toward food security. The Somerville Health Awards will contribute to Groundwork Somerville’s “Salad Days for Healthy Eaters” program, which teaches youths to plant, harvest, and prepare nutritious foods. The awards will also help the Somerville Food Security Coalition launch free, monthly community meals that feature a hot buffet, children’s activities, a pop-up food pantry, and live music.

In the more than 20 years since the foundation launched the awards, they have helped fund programs that went on to have demonstrated success. For example, one of the previous grantees, the Mystic Learning Center, was able to fund a highly effective healthy eating program for youth thanks to the funding offered by the Somerville Health Foundation. The program revolutionized the way participating families ate, encouraging them to cook with wholesome ingredients. One nine-year-old began the program after being diagnosed with prediabetes, and after participating in the program for three months, his tests came back clear.

“The key value of this foundation is to support organizations in doing work that they want to pilot or explore that impacts us,” explains Brukilacchio.

“It’s really about having healthy communities,” she says.

Viruses Spread by Insects to Crops Sound Scary. The Military Calls It Food Security.

Viruses Spread by Insects to Crops Sound Scary. The Military Calls It Food Security.

Viruses Spread by Insects to Crops Sound Scary. The Military Calls It Food Security.

Critics warn that a Defense Department-funded food security project that is still in the lab could set off a “biological arms race.”

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Scientists warn that insects carrying genetically modified viruses to strengthen crops from various hazards could just as soon be used for nefarious purposes.CreditCreditSue Ogrocki/Associated Press

Within the Defense Department, one agency’s recent project sounds futuristic: millions of insects carrying viruses descend upon crops and then genetically modify them to withstand droughts, floods and foreign attacks, ensuring a permanently secure food supply.

But in a warning published Thursday in the journal Science, a group of independent scientists and lawyers objected to the research, which has not yet moved out of the lab. They argue that the endeavor is not so different from designing biological weapons — banned under international law since 1975 — that could swarm and destroy acres of crops.

The dispute is the latest episode in an ongoing international debate over the pursuit of what is called dual-use research: technological discoveries that can be beneficial or pose threats to human welfare. As gene-editing tools become increasingly accessible, scientists, ethicists and policymakers are weighing the good pivotal discoveries could do for humanity against their nefarious potential.

“Once you engineer a virus that spreads by insect, it is hard to imagine how you would ever control it,” said Guy Reeves, a researcher at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology in Germany, who contributed to the critique.

reduce mosquito fertility, halting diseases like malaria.)

Researchers at four institutions — Boyce Thompson Institute in New York, Ohio State University, Pennsylvania State University and the University of Texas-Austin — have since been experimenting with the targeted gene therapy they hope will help farmers face issues like frost and disease.

But the critics said publishing the new research findings could establish “preliminary instruction manuals” for developing offensive biological weapons. Beyond strengthening crops’ resilience, insects could be easily engineered to carry viruses that destroy plants, Dr. Reeves said.

He added that one of the main species targeted in the research is maize, a staple source of nutrition for hundreds of millions of people in Latin America and Africa.

Foreign military programs are often “driven by perception of competitors’ activities,” the critics warn, and “the mere announcement of this program may motivate other countries to develop their own capabilities in this arena — indeed, it may have already done so.”

The scholars suggested enhancing pre-existing methods of crop protection, such as aerial spraying, but Darpa program executives consider those tools expensive and imprecise. They also said the critique mischaracterized their research by suggesting that these viruses would permanently modify a plant’s genome. That is not the case, Dr. Bextine said.

“If you see a drought coming, you can deploy the system to sustain a period of difficulty, and then go back to a natural state,” Dr. Bextine said. “We are developing tools that are futuristic, but they are based very much in reality. This is biology we understand very well.”

Darpa has included the Department of Agriculture, the Environmental Protection Agency, the Food and Drug Administration and other regulators throughout the project. It also requires researchers to include at least three kill switches, or emergency brakes, in their systems as a safety measure.

Dr. Reeves was not satisfied.

“I think this project was decided down one quiet corridor — an agency with intentionally little oversight that comes up with slightly crazy ideas — and top people in the Pentagon will be as shocked as I was,” he said.

Darpa officers conceded that their agency’s work often involves calculated risk. Still, they consider it core to their mission to consider the benefits.

“We’re glad people are asking questions,” Dr. Bextine said. “But food security is national security. It stabilizes our society.”

A version of this article appears in print on , on Page A13 of the New York edition with the headline: Critics Warn Project Could Turn Insects Into Weapons

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